uber for business

UPHD protests Uber at the Business Travel Show over worker rights

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Uber drivers to attend Business Travel Show to tell corporate customers to abide by their own ethical supply chain policies on worker rights

Today, February 22 at 0930, UPHD Uber driver members will attend the Business Travel Show at the Olympia in London where Uber will be exhibiting and the company’s Global Head of Enterprise, Travis Bogard is scheduled to deliver a keynote. The drivers will deliver a simple message to corporate travel buyers: they must abide by their own ethical supply chain policies and pressure Uber to respect the worker rights of drivers.

In October 2016, the Central London Employment Tribunal ruled in a case brought by UPHD co-founders Yaseen Aslam and James Farrar that Uber drivers must be classed as worker rights entitling them to the national minimum wage, holiday pay, health & safety and other provisions. Unfortunately, Uber still has not delivered on its moral and legal commitments to observe the law. Drivers, continue to be bound by abusive contracts with Uber’s Dutch entity which pushes all the cost and risk on drivers while Uber hides from its social responsibilities. Drivers continue to work 90 to 100 hours per week earning little over £5 per hour.

Uber for Business is big business now accounting for 50% corporate budgets for ground transport and 52% of business travel receipts according to Certify. Uber already boasts of having more than 1,000 corporate clients in the UK who allow staff to expense Uber services costs including the likes of:

  • Accenture
  • Morgan Stanley
  • JP Morgan
  • Transport for London
  • Salesforce
  • Goldman Sachs

Uber also has investor relations with firms with big UK operations including

  • Microsoft
  • Google

Nearly all of these firms have strict supplier codes of conduct which prohibit the use of sweated labour in the supply chain and require that suppliers pay their workers a living wage and obey all local employment laws.

Rather than call for a boycott, today at the Business Travel Show, we are demanding that all firms using Uber or investing in Uber now abide by their own or common ethical supply chain and investment standards. They should use their considerable influence to:

  • Demand Uber obey all employment laws
  • Pay the minimum wage to its workers
  • Ensure that it is not complicit in violation of worker rights by ensuring it pays a fair rate for the service it receives and that any additional payments to Uber do flow through to the driver

James Farrar, Co Founder of UPHD said:

‘These firms must do the right thing and live up to their own ethical policies or rescind them. UK Uber drivers suffer greatly in an abusive and exploitative employment relationship with Uber. We want Uber’s corporate customers to be part of the solution not a contributor to the problem.’

 

Yaseen Aslam, Co Founder of UPHD said:

‘Corporations often say people are their most important assets. If this is really true then firms must consider the risks associated with drivers having to work 90 hours a week or more just to survive.’

 

CONTACTS

James Farrar 07530 319206

Yaseen Aslam 07894 528992

 

NOTES

  • In October 2016, the Central London Employment Tribunal ruled in a case brought by UPHD co-founders Yaseen Aslam and James Farrar that Uber drivers must be classed as worker rights entitling them to the national minimum wage, holiday pay, health & safety and other provisions. Unfortunately, Uber still has not delivered on its moral and legal commitments to observe the law. Drivers, continue to be bound by abusive contracts with Uber’s Dutch entity which pushes all the cost and risk on drivers while Uber hides from its social responsibilities.

https://www.judiciary.gov.uk/judgments/mr-y-aslam-mr-j-farrar-and-others-v-uber/

  • In December 2016, Frank Field MP, Chair of the Work and Pensions Select Committee likened Uber labour to the sweated labour conditions of the Victorian era.

http://www.frankfield.com/upload/docs/Sweated%20Labour%20-%20Uber%20and%20the%20'gig%20economy'.pdf

  • Today the Parliamentary Work and Pensions Select Committee will hear testimony from Uber executives as it considers how government policy should change in light of the growth of precarious employment in the gig economy.
  • On Monday February 20, Iain Wright, Chair of the Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy Select Committee called on all government departments to stop using Uber services until it agrees to observe the established rights of its workers.

 

Accenture Supplier Standards of Conduct

Comply with all applicable wage and hour laws Accenture suppliers comply with all applicable wage and hour laws and regulations. People must not be required to work more than the maximum work week hours established by local law, including overtime, except in extraordinary business circumstances and with the consent of the individual. People must be paid at least the minimum wage required by applicable laws and regulations and provided all required benefits. People must be compensated for overtime hours at the rate required by applicable laws and regulations.

https://www.accenture.com/us-en/_acnmedia/Accenture/Conversion-Assets/DotCom/Documents/Global/PDF/About-Accenture/Accenture-Supplier-Standards-of-Conduct-English-Feb-2014.pdf#zoom=50

UN Global Compact Signatory

 

JPMorgan Chase Supplier Code of Conduct

JPMC expects our Suppliers to promote and respect human rights by working to prevent child and/or forced labor and human trafficking in their operations and supply chains, and by instituting practices and operations that are consistent with the framework provided by the Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights.

https://www.jpmorganchase.com/corporate/About-JPMC/document/Supplier-Code-of-Conduct.pdf

 

Morgan Stanley supplier code

We endeavor to exercise our influence in part by conducting our business operations in ways that attempt to preserve, protect and promote the full range of human rights such as those described in the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR). http://www.morganstanley.com/globalcitizen/pdf/human_rights_statement.pdf

UDHR Article 23

(3) Everyone who works has the right to just and favourable remuneration ensuring for himself and his family an existence worthy of human dignity, and supplemented, if necessary, by other means of social protection.

From <http://www.un.org/en/universal-declaration-human-rights/index.html>

 

Transport for London Ethical Sourcing Policy

LIVING WAGES ARE PAID

Wages and benefits paid for a standard working week meet, at a minimum, national legal standards or industry benchmark standards, whichever is higher. In any event wages should always be enough to meet basic needs and to provide some discretionary income.

All workers shall be provided with written and understandable information about their employment conditions in respect to wages before they enter employment and about the particulars of their wages for the pay period concerned each time that they are paid.

Deductions from wages as a disciplinary measure shall not be permitted nor shall any deductions from wages not provided for by national law be permitted without the expressed permission of the worker concerned. All disciplinary measures should be recorded.

WORKING HOURS ARE NOT EXCESSIVE

Working hours comply with national laws and benchmark industry standards, whichever affords greater protection.

http://content.tfl.gov.uk/tfl-ethical-sourcing-policy.pdf

 

Google supplier code

Compensation paid to workers must comply with all applicable wage laws, including those relating to minimum wages, overtime hours and legally mandated benefits. Supplier will compensate workers for overtime consistent with applicable local law. Supplier will not permit deductions from wages as a disciplinary measure. Supplier will provide workers with the basis on which workers are paid via pay stub or similar documentation.

https://www.google.com/about/responsible-manufacturing.html

 

Microsoft Supplier Code

Pay applicable legal wages under humane conditions. All workers must be provided with clear and understandable written information about their employment conditions in a language understood by the worker with respect to wages, benefits, location of work, living conditions, housing and associated costs, including any costs charged to employee and, if applicable, the hazardous nature of any work before they enter employment and as needed throughout their term of employment. Deductions from wages as a disciplinary measure will not be permitted nor will any deductions from wages not provided for by national law or local law be permitted without the express, written permission of the worker concerned. All disciplinary measures should be recorded. Wages and benefits paid for a standard working week must meet local and national legal standards.

https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/procurement/supplier-conduct.aspx

 

UPHD Member Surveys

In recent surveys of UPHD Uber drivers our members report:

  • 84% can no longer afford to meet basic family needs on their Uber income despite working full time
  • 91% say they are not paid fairly
  • 88% feel they are not respected by Uber
  • 86% say Uber does take responsibility for their safety and security

The long hours on low pay have also taken a devastating toll on the physical and mental health of Uber drivers in Britain’s booming economy:

  • 30% of our Uber driver members have been prescribed anti depressants since starting work
  • 84% report of worrying about family finances frequently or all the time
  • 33% have experienced suicide ideation
  • 42% have experienced panic attacks
  • 74% say their family and personal relationships have suffered